Extimacy

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French: extimité

Jacques Lacan[edit | edit source]

Translation[edit | edit source]

Lacan coins the term extimité by applying the prefix ex -- from exterieur, "exterior" -- to the Freud word intimité -- "intimacy".

"Inside" and "Outside"[edit | edit source]

The resulting neologism, which may be rendered "extimacy in English, neatly expresses the way in which psychoanalysis problematizes the opposition between "inside" and "outside"<ref>Lacan, Jacques. The Seminar. Book VII. The Ethics of Psychoanalysis, 1959-60. Trans. Dennis Porter. London: Routledge, 1992. p. 139</ref>

Examples[edit | edit source]

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For example, the real is just as much inside as outside. The unconscious is not a purely interior psychic system but an intersubjective structure -- "the unconscious is outside".

Subject as Ex-centric[edit | edit source]

Again, the Other is "something strange to me, although it is at the heart of me."<ref>Lacan, Jacques. The Seminar. Book VII. The Ethics of Psychoanalysis, 1959-60. Trans. Dennis Porter. London: Routledge, 1992. p. 71</ref> Furthermore, the center of the subject is outside; the subject is ex-centric.<ref>Lacan, Jacques. Écrits: A Selection. Trans. Alan Sheridan. London: Tavistock Publications, 1977. p.165, 171</ref>

Topological Structure of Extimacy[edit | edit source]

The structure of extimacy is perfectly expressed in the topology of the torus and of the moebius strip.

See Also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

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